Dr. Mark Elliott

Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering

In his research, Dr. Mark Elliott places emphasis on understanding the challenges and opportunities of water and sanitation engineering in resource-poor countries. His doctoral work was based around the biosand filter, a household-scale slow sand filter being used by roughly one million people, and focused on characterizing reductions of the major classes of pathogens, identifying… Read more about Dr. Mark Elliott

New SEC Program to Match Entrepreneurs, University Startups

The University of Alabama, along with the rest of the Southeastern Conference, is launching the Southeast Executives-on-Roster to broaden access to experienced entrepreneurial talent and to match that talent to university-affiliated startups in need of executive management. Read more

In The News: Doug Jones Thinks He’s Supposed To Be Here

“I literally had déjà vu the first time I stepped out of the van in one of these situations because it had the smell and the heat and the humidity — it was just like being in rural Vietnam or Cambodia or Haiti,” said Mark Elliot, who’s an engineering professor… Read more

Sources: Five Thirty Eight

In The News: Former Oconee resident works on septic system improvements in Alabama

Joe Booth, a former resident of Athens and Watkinsville, is participating in a project at the University of Alabama to develop new technology for septic systems to help homeowners in an area of Alabama known as the Black Belt. That area is notorious for septic problems due to the hard… Read more

Sources: Athens Banner-Herald

In The News: EPA Awards more than $28,000 in Grants to the University of Alabama for Innovative Technology Projects

Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced the University of Alabama would receive two grants totaling $28,909 to fund two Phase I student teams through the People, Prosperity, and the Planet (P3) grants program. Over $463,000 in funding is being provided by the program for 31 teams nationwide that… Read more

Sources: EPA.gov, NBC 13 (Birmingham)

In The News: Diseases of Poverty Identified in Alabama County Burdened by Poor Sanitation

In the poorest sections of the American South researchers are finding hookworm, dengue fever, and other parasites and viruses that are more commonly associated with developing countries or, in the United States, with the early years of the 20th century. . . . Failing septic systems and the use of… Read more

Sources: Circle of Blue

In The News: Troubled Water: Wells aren’t regulated and septic tanks aren’t inspected

Most of the 43 million Americans who rely on private wells don’t know if their water is safe to drink because unlike the regulation of public water systems, there is no government monitoring of wells … In areas where proper wastewater treatment is rare, regulation is not enforced “because a… Read more

Sources: TC Palm (Florida)

In The News: Crumbling pipes, tainted water plague black communities

Deep in the winding mass of crumbling back streets in Campti, Leroy Hayes sets a glass of water from his faucet in a patch of sunlight on the railing of his porch and watches specks of sediment float to the top … Mark Elliott, a civil engineer and researcher at… Read more

Sources: Public Integrity, Wisconsin Gazette

In The News: UA students cultivate LED-light technology for disinfecting drinking water and saving lives in developing countries.

The idea of using LED light to purify water might sound like something from a futuristic science-fiction movie, but thanks to a group of chemical engineering students at The University of Alabama, the future might be closer than you think. Read more

Sources: Service Learning